Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Thursday Thirteen - Jury Duty

I've gone to jury duty a number of times and served on a civil case about twenty years ago.  Here are some things I learned form my jury duty experience today.

1.  It's a long walk from the parking to the jury plaza.
2.  There is a lot of waiting.
3.  The benches in the courtroom are harder than church pews!!!!  Three and a half hours without a break makes for an aching back.
4.  Just because a person speaks in courtrooms, does not mean he/she is a good public speaker.
5.  Addressing people by their correct name is important.
6.  You must presume someone innocent even though the Grand Jury decided there was enough evidence against that person to indict.  (I'm okay with that.)
7.  Attorneys usually don't choose law enforcement personnel for their juries.
8.  It costs more to park than you get paid for the day  ($8/$6).
9.  Burglary of a habitation does not mean the person broke in the house.  They may have walked in an unlocked or open door.
10. Burglary of a habitation does not mean a theft took place.
11. Female judges who smile a lot are probably more strict than their unsmiling male counterparts.
12.  You're lucky if you get a bailiff with a good sense of humor.
13.  The intentions of a person is difficult to prove.
Bonus fact - You can donate your $6 jury pay to a number of charities.

So, I did my civic duty today, and even though some of it was boring or difficult, I would be happy to do it again.  Have you visited the home of the new Thursday Thirteen?

5 comments:

The Lovely One said...

I've never served on a jury before. Most of the time I've been dismissed when I call in. I've only made into the court house once, and they settled before the jury was chosen. I keep waiting!

Heather said...

I wouldn't last two hours on one of those hard benches. It's a toss up whether my neck or knees (from cramped space with no room to move) would protest first.

Ron. said...

I have much the same attitude about jury duty, but have never been called. My Beloved Sandra, a professional for whom jury duty presents a significant inconvenience has been called twice.

sandyland said...

I've done it a lot in my past it's not my favorite thing to do - so much of this is very very true

CountryDew said...

I have always wanted to serve on a jury, but I since I am a news writer I am always dismissed. Journalists must be like law enforcement - know a little too much, maybe.

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