Thursday, July 14, 2016

What can I do?

I've often wondered what I can do to help race relations, and relations with protestors, police, media, etc.  What is my part?  My role?  I have always heard, "If you're not part of the solution, you are part of the problem."  I searched and found some reasonable ideas for Thursday Thirteen.

1.  Avoid stereotypical language.  Don't generalize.  All __________ people are bad drivers.  All ___________ people are on welfare.  All _____________________ people like ______________ .  I know I don't want people to think that I am like all the teachers they see on the news, so why should I assume that all people of one color, religion, career, are the same.

2.  Speak up when someone is telling a racist joke.  It is not okay.

3.  Demonstrating good citizenship. Know the issues and vote.  Don't just vote for a person based on their name or party.
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4.  Don't allow what I see, read, hear, or watch to manipulate me to think a certain way that conflicts with my own ideals.

5.  As a teacher, I can lead by example.  I can demonstrate within my classroom  what a multi-cultural world should look like.

Ideas paraphrased and adapted from "Ten Simple Things You Can Do to Improve Race Relations" by Charles A. Gallagher

6.  Make a commitment to learn more about other races, religions, and cultures either by conversing with others or reading about them.  Visit other areas in my region where members of other races, religions, and cultures live to see what it is like.
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7.  Support businesses and institutions that promote racial inclusion.

8.  Encourage schools to recognize in positive ways the various cultures that make up our country.

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9.  Encourage young people in my circle of influence (my own children and my students) to get to know people of other races.
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10. Join a volunteer group that supports amicable race relations

11.  Create a program in the community you live that bring together young people from diverse backgrounds.  Local libraries and inter-faith caring ministries may be able to accomplish this.

12. Research what other communities are doing to address racial equality.

13.  Pray.


6 comments:

Gemma Wiseman said...

A great collection of maxims for living a productive life.

sandyland said...

where I live there is virtually no racism of any kind I'm wondering why there is in certain parts of country or is it overblown ??just wondering ??

colleen said...

#1 would make so much difference. I have a great quote about this on my TT today.

Mia Celeste said...

Great suggestions. All are good, but I like number 13 the best.

http://tinyurl.com/zd5ws2h

Heather said...

Good topic! My T13

CountryDew said...

I think traveling, even if it is to an area of your own city or town that you never go, is the best way to see how others really live. We have sections that are really poor and run down, but they are hidden in the hollows and most people don't realize there are folks living in beat-up campers and trailers. They don't visit the area where the Section 8 housing is. Moving out of the circle of your comfort zone is important.

Very good TT and an important one.

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